Story card
The story card is a box with information about a story. It also shows your own reading progress with regards to this story. This is the main entry point for reading a story, listening to a story, or learning a story's vocabulary.

1. Main information


First, let's have a look at the main information on the card, before diving deeper into the different tabs (figure 1).

figure 1: the story card in expanded form

  • 1. The flag represents the language in which the story is written. If you want to read in a different language, you can change the language with the language selectors.
  • 2. The cover image for the story.
  • 3. The language combination that you have selected at the top of the list. The first flag represents the language of the story, the second the language for the translations (your native language). If either of these languages is incorrect, you can change them with the language selectors at the top of the story list.
  • 4. The play button is available if there is an audio recording of the story title available. Click on this button to hear the title in the source language.
  • 5. The large green checkmark indicates that you have completely read this story (or listened to the story, or learned its vocabulary, depending on the selected tab, see below).
  • 6. The title of the story.
  • 7. Below the title you can see the story type (book, short story, children's story, fairy tale, play, speech, report, biography,...) followed by the name of the author and the year the story was published. To the right is a copyright icon. Click on this icon to see under what kind of license this story was published as well as all applicable attributions (figure 2).
    figure 2: licenses & attributions
  • There might also be an info icon right next to the copyright icon. Click on it to see extra information such as the name of the series the story belongs to or an introduction to this story.
  • 8. In the top right corner of the story card you can see the number of the story in the current story list and the total number of stories. The latter depends on the type of story list, the selected language for the stories as well as on any filters that may have been applied.
  • 9. Click on the thumb icon to indicate that you recommend this story. This icon is only visible if you have finished the story at least once.
  • 10. With the pin icon you can add a story to your 'My stories' list.
  • 11. The central section of the story part displays your progress. See 'Progress tabs' below for more info.
  • 12. The number of people who have recommended the story. Note that you can only recommend a story once you've finished it.
  • 13. The number of people who have started using the story.


2. Progress tabs


A story card can have between one and three tabs that display your progress for reading, listening and vocabulary. The default tab is defined by the type of list you have selected in the main navigation bar. The color of the card reflects the tab you have selected for this particular story: blue for your reading progress, ochre for your listening progress and red for your vocabulary progress.

2.1. Reading progress


When you select the 'Read' tab in the story card, you are presented with the following information (figure 3):

figure 3: reading progress

  • 1. A green checkmark indicates that you have read this story at least once.
  • 2. In bold you see the total number of sentences the story contains. If translations for these sentences are available you can see the number of translated sentences on the right. If all sentences in the story have been translated into the target language, you will see a green checkmark here. Make sure you have selected the correct target language. If not, you can change it with the language selectors.
  • 3. The difficulty score gives an indication of how difficult a story is. The score is calculated taking a multitude of factors into account, including how common the words are, how long sentences are etc.
  • 4. Click on the green button to read the story. Depending on the status it will have a different label. It will show either 'Start reading', 'Continue reading' or 'Read again'.
  • 5. The review button is only visible once you've finished the story. It brings you to the review page where you can see all sentences per chapter at once.
  • 6. The pie chart shows the proportion of the sentences which were answered with yes (green), maybe (yellow) or no (red) to the question 'Do you understand this sentence?'. The pie chart only refers to the most recent read-through. If you read the story more than once, it only shows the data for the most recent read-through. The data for the previous read-throughs can be seen in the reading history section (see below).
  • 7. The progress bar shows how many sentences you have read as a percentage of the total number of sentences in the story.
  • 8. If you have read the story already and started reading it again, a number indicating the number of times you have read the story will appear to the right of the progress bar. If you click on the number you can see the history of your previous read-throughs (figure 4):
    figure 4: reading or listening history

2.2. Listening progress


If there is an audio version of the story available, you will also see a 'Listen' tab on the story card (figure 5).
figure 5: listening progress

The main difference with the reading progress is that there are now two progress sections: the one on the left shows how far you've progressed with regards to listening to the story, while the one on the right shows the progress regarding the listening test.

2.3. Vocabulary progress


When you select the 'glossary' tab, you will see many features that are similar to those on the 'Read' and 'Listen' tabs, but there are also a few differences, which are outlined below (figure 6):
figure 6: vocabulary progress


  • 1. In bold you see the total number of words that are available in the glossary for this story. If translations for these words in your selected target language are available you can see the number of translated words in parentheses. If all words in the story have been translated into the target language, you will see a green checkmark here. Make sure you have selected the correct target language. If not, you can change it with the language selectors.
  • 2. This is similar to above, with the difference being that the words and translations counted here are only for those words you have pinned to your own glossary.
  • 3. If you click on the green 'Flashcard' button, you will see a dropdown with two options (figure 7):
  • figure 7: flashcard selection
  • If you select 'Jazyk's glossary', you will get flashcards for all the words in the glossary, with the default translations. Note that you can only start flashcards for words which have translations in your target language. If there are no translations available, you won't be able to start flashcards.
  • If you select 'My glossary', you will get flashcards only for those words you have pinned to your glossary, and for which there are translations available. The translations will be those in your glossary (which you can change to your liking). If you haven't pinned any words to your glossary, you will not be able to select the second dropdown option.
  • 4. The 'Glossary' button brings you to the list of words available in the glossary. Here you can see a list of all the vocabulary in Jazyk's glossary and pin words to your glossary.
  • 5. The pie chart shows the proportion of the words for which the last answer was incorrect (in red) and those for which the last answer was correct (in green). The pie chart refers to the most recent test, i.e. it will show data from your own glossary or from jazyk's glossary depending on which test you did most recently.
  • 6. The progress bar shows how many words you have tested with flashcards as a percentage of the total number of words in the glossary. This can be either jazyk's glossary or your own glossary, depending on what you used most recently.


2. Other story card forms


The explanations above all refer to the default - expanded - form of a story card, in which all data is shown for each story. You may also come across two more compact formats of the story card: the collapsed form and the dashboard form.

2.1. Collapsed form


In the story list, a story card can be shown in its collapsed form (figure 8). In this form it doesn't show all the information but it takes up a lot less space. If you want to see the story card in its full, expanded form, simply click on it.

figure 8: the collapsed form

  • A. The green button starts a repeat of the story.
  • B. The light blue button brings you to the review page of the story, where you can see all the sentences per chapter at once.
  • For an explanation of the other features, see the relevant number in the section '1. Main information' above.

Whether a story is shown in collapsed mode depends on the list you selected on the main navigation bar. In the read list, the story card will be collapsed if you have finished reading the story (and have not restarted it). In the listen list, the story will be collapsed of you have listened to the whole story (and have not restarted it). At the time of writing there is no collapsed mode for the glossary list yet.

2.2. Compact form


On the dashboard, you can see the stories you've recently been active in in a compact form (figure 9), where only the most essential data is displayed.

figure 9: compact form for listening test

The main difference with the expanded form is that there is a separate story card for reading, listening, listening test and vocabulary. Other than that the functionality is exactly the same as in the expanded form with one exception: there is an additional button 'Full card' which will bring you to a filtered list with just this story shown in expanded mode.